Secrets of How to Win at Paintball

Most team sports require teamwork, skill, and planning. This can be seen in the winning teams of sports like basketball, football, and hockey. The same approach can be taken to make an excellent paintball team.

The best way to become a championship team is to know how to play both as a team and individually. It starts at practice where the team will learn to play both offenses and in defense.

War games are simulated to emulate the real thing. A fort can be made, and some members selected to protect it while the other group attacks. After each game, an assessment must be made so that any mistakes made can be corrected to make the team more efficient.

There are several ways that the exercise can end: by capturing the flag, eliminating all the members of the other group or waiting until the time expires. An excellent way to train the participants to move swiftly during an offensive is by agreeing to a time limit before the exercise begins…

The members should rotate the roles of offense and defense during a training exercise as both will have to be used in a real game.

Marksmanship should also be part of training. The members must be able to hit both stationary and moving targets since both are necessary for an actual game where both sides have limited ammunition.

Since the exercise usually lasts from 30 minutes to an hour, the team should make every shot count. The players should only fire when there is a clear shot available rather than not being able to shoot when it matters the most.

Stealth is another element needed to win the game of paintball. By being able to sneak up on the enemy first, the team can attack the enemy position before the opposing forces can mount a counterattack.

Learning to communicate using hand signals and sounds will prevent the other team from knowing what the team’s plans are. By practicing all of these drills and scenarios in practice, the group will be ready to take on anyone in the league.

The secret to winning at paintball is not rocket science; it just takes a lot of practice so that each person knows what to do which will pay off during competition.

 

Paintball: it is not a game, it is a cool war

Paintball is a game where there are two groups (teams) of players, and each group aims to eliminate the opposite team via shooting paintballs at each other.

The following are the basic rules in playing paintball.

 

Follow the referee:

Paintball should have only one referee for each game. This referee who will start and end the game as well as stop it (to check for paint) and be the decision maker should fix any problems or game issues arise. Fortunately or unfortunately, any verdict issued by the referee – as in any other game – is final and cannot be repealed.

 

You are out:

A player is no longer in the game if he or she is shot by a paintball marker that cracks or splatters on him or her. This applies when the marker or pellet breaks anywhere on the player’s clothes, equipment or gun. Take note that whether the shot came from a fellow teammate or an enemy, the marked player is required to call out “DEADMAN” or to yell “OUT” about themselves. They are required to immediately leave the field using the route that is the safest as well as shortest, all the while calling himself out.

 

You are in:

If a player is hit by a paintball marker and the marker does not crack or break, that player is still in the game. A player is also considered in the game if he or she is accidentally splattered by a paintball marker, especially if the splatter is caused by the paintball marker hitting a rock, a bush or tree. But this rule no longer applies if the player calls him or her self “OUT” or “DEADMAN” even if they have mistakenly thought that they were hit only discover that they were not. The rule says that they are still required to leave the field using the safest as well as the shortest route.

 

Safety is the best policy.

All players are required to wear protective clothing that covers the arms, neck, and legs. “T” shirts are not allowed to be worn during the game. All players must have goggles as well, and these cannot in any way, be removed during play.

Paintball is a game of strategy as well as quick thinking. But just like any other game, some rules need to be observed to make the game not only more challenging, fun, exciting, but most importantly fair.

 

Paintball: the art of retreat

In cases where you encounter a situation where you or your paintball team have to back down and retreat, the following are effective ways to make retreating more effective, if not successful.

 

Always have a plan b:

When you or your squad needs to move to another position, make sure that this area is far safer as this will be the place where you have to retreat to. Plan so that you will know the ideal place for you and your team to be. Usually, good places to retreat are those that provide cover for the team or is a nearer to the other squad units of your team. It is essential that this area is known by everyone, and all know how to get there. It is also important that all go there together when such a need arises.

 

Fight together, run together:

When it is time to retreat, retreat altogether, retreat as one group. “All for one and one for all” is the best defense you can have. Your group’s combined strength is a force to reckon with when under attack.

Imagine if your team was to run off in various directions, you would be unable to watch and protect each other. It is difficult to battle the enemy if everyone is far apart, especially if you and your other teammates are safely nestled in their separate areas.

 

Fire, fire, and fire:

The most effective way to break from an attack is to fire back with an enormous amount of paintball ammunition as this will cause the opposing team to hide and protect themselves from your fire. When the leader of your squad decides to retreat, continue firing altogether, hit everything that is moving for about three seconds and then, retreat! Do not forget to fire back and occasionally turn around to check on anyone who may be firing at you. Do this as a group.

Keep in mind that retreats are not an opportunity to duck and cover but to make moves that are strategically important to the group’s welfare. Therefore, it should be quick.

 

An exception to the rule

There is an exception to the “fire when retreating rule.” The act of retreating and not returning any shots is when you or your squad is asked to help your fellow team members. On this occasion, moving as a unit with speed is still very important.

Retreating is not easy, but it could be the best choice you or your group have to keep your team from losing.

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